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Daisy's Story

Daisy is a delightful 1 year old who faces uncertainty in her future. Could you be the loving, nurturing and supportive family that Daisy needs to develop to her full potential?  Pink Baby Portait

Daisy is described by her carers as an adorable little girl, who is pleasant, content and thriving: “such a good girl, always smiling”.  Daisy is now more alert throughout the day, she responds to her name with lovely smiles and recognises faces and voices particularly those of her carers. 

Her carers inform that “Daisy is a lovely, happy, smiley, beautiful baby; a joy and pleasure to care for and also very easy.  She brings a lot of joy.”  Daisy is developing strong attachments to both of her carers and responds to them with smiles and lovely giggles, and saves her biggest smile for their teenage son.

Daisy likes Violet, her toy musical activity dog, and this goes everywhere with her.  She likes her musical swing chair; activity music toys, and her play mat, particularly the colour red on it.  She likes seeing herself in the mirror, giving herself big smiles. Daisy enjoys the fish tank, watching and grabbing out at the fish. 

Daisy was born prematurely at 28 weeks and needed breathing support within a few minutes of delivery. She experienced a very difficult start to her life, she was incubated for three to four weeks and also experienced withdrawal at birth due to her birth mother’s use of heroin, cocaine and alcohol during pregnancy.  Daisy was placed with her current and only carers at 10 weeks old from hospital and her carers confirm that she is now developing well and thriving in placement.  Daisy continues to feed off formula milk every four hours and is due to start weaning soon, a recent episode of Bronchilitis delayed this, and she has an intolerance to cow’s milk.  Daisy loves to have a little sleep against her carers shoulder when having a milk feed and also loves to feel her face against her carers whilst she does this.

Daisy has a diagnosis of Cystic Bilateral Periventricular Leukomalacia (PVL). This is a serious brain injury well recognised in preterm infants born under 32 weeks gestation. The areas of damaged brain show up as multiple cysts in the brain tissue (in this case they are widespread and on both sides).  The presence of PVL of this severity greatly increases the risk of significant disability later in life (up to 80%).  Daisy also has a diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy from birth and experienced a brain bleed, both left and right side, that happened either in the womb or during intensive care.

Despite her diagnosis Daisy’s carers are pleased with her progress, they feel she is delayed but that the delay could be due to being almost three months premature and inform Daisy is doing new things every day and that her progress has been fantastic: she is trying to sit up; can lift her neck, head and shoulders; and kicks her arms and legs. They inform that Daisy can do most things: reaches out and grabs; and has got good fine motor skills, a little stiff and slower, but improving all of the time.   Daisy has made good vocal progress and copies sounds and babbles.

Due to Daisy’s diagnosed of PVL, it is a possibility that Daisy will need intense one-to-one attention and that she will require a high level of care, not just from her adoptive family but from a multidisciplinary team including: community paediatrics; physiotherapy; and speech and language therapy.  Due to this, Daisy needs a family who can: accept the significant uncertainty in her development and future; fully commit to her for who she is; and give her the stable and nurturing environment that she needs and the best life that she deserves. 

Daisy's Story

Daisy is a delightful 1 year old who faces uncertainty in her future. Could you be the loving, nurturing and supportive family that Daisy needs to develop to her full potential?  Pink Baby Portait

Daisy is described by her carers as an adorable little girl, who is pleasant, content and thriving: “such a good girl, always smiling”.  Daisy is now more alert throughout the day, she responds to her name with lovely smiles and recognises faces and voices particularly those of her carers. 

Her carers inform that “Daisy is a lovely, happy, smiley, beautiful baby; a joy and pleasure to care for and also very easy.  She brings a lot of joy.”  Daisy is developing strong attachments to both of her carers and responds to them with smiles and lovely giggles, and saves her biggest smile for their teenage son.

Daisy likes Violet, her toy musical activity dog, and this goes everywhere with her.  She likes her musical swing chair; activity music toys, and her play mat, particularly the colour red on it.  She likes seeing herself in the mirror, giving herself big smiles. Daisy enjoys the fish tank, watching and grabbing out at the fish. 

Daisy was born prematurely at 28 weeks and needed breathing support within a few minutes of delivery. She experienced a very difficult start to her life, she was incubated for three to four weeks and also experienced withdrawal at birth due to her birth mother’s use of heroin, cocaine and alcohol during pregnancy.  Daisy was placed with her current and only carers at 10 weeks old from hospital and her carers confirm that she is now developing well and thriving in placement.  Daisy continues to feed off formula milk every four hours and is due to start weaning soon, a recent episode of Bronchilitis delayed this, and she has an intolerance to cow’s milk.  Daisy loves to have a little sleep against her carers shoulder when having a milk feed and also loves to feel her face against her carers whilst she does this.

Daisy has a diagnosis of Cystic Bilateral Periventricular Leukomalacia (PVL). This is a serious brain injury well recognised in preterm infants born under 32 weeks gestation. The areas of damaged brain show up as multiple cysts in the brain tissue (in this case they are widespread and on both sides).  The presence of PVL of this severity greatly increases the risk of significant disability later in life (up to 80%).  Daisy also has a diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy from birth and experienced a brain bleed, both left and right side, that happened either in the womb or during intensive care.

Despite her diagnosis Daisy’s carers are pleased with her progress, they feel she is delayed but that the delay could be due to being almost three months premature and inform Daisy is doing new things every day and that her progress has been fantastic: she is trying to sit up; can lift her neck, head and shoulders; and kicks her arms and legs. They inform that Daisy can do most things: reaches out and grabs; and has got good fine motor skills, a little stiff and slower, but improving all of the time.   Daisy has made good vocal progress and copies sounds and babbles.

Due to Daisy’s diagnosed of PVL, it is a possibility that Daisy will need intense one-to-one attention and that she will require a high level of care, not just from her adoptive family but from a multidisciplinary team including: community paediatrics; physiotherapy; and speech and language therapy.  Due to this, Daisy needs a family who can: accept the significant uncertainty in her development and future; fully commit to her for who she is; and give her the stable and nurturing environment that she needs and the best life that she deserves.